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from the marketing department of a multi-billion dollars organization that really has a big financial stake in the future of books. it's important to remember that if someone has a future that completely and 100% is tied up in e-books, they will try to figure the book in the state of the book is all about e-books. now, in order to try to separate the rhetoric from the reality of simba information on with our parent company, we put together a nationally representative u.s. consumer survey. and we wanted to go to the entire u.s. adult population and basically ask who is buying these things anyway. do you buy e-books? what devices on which do you become how many books do you buy and so forth? and over the three-year period we've been collecting data and we have begun collecting it quarterly for our three e-book publishing 2011 report, we found that about 90% of the u.s. adult population hasn't bought a single solitary digital book. not a single e-book. we also found that because we asked questions that print book buyer still outnumber e-book buyers, about five to one. and the other thing
of its reputation now. think of the vonnegut books and the books that were big in the '60s and '70s if you're old enough to have been around then. very different books now. malcolm muckeridge marshall mcclewin. i'm in the ms today. [laughter] cultural superstars then, and they don't show up now. so that's, i think, the first thing. the other thing is the biography of a person, you dig into letters, you dig into reminiscences and so on. here you have mainly a narrative of where it's gone, what's happened to it along the way. and it was such a delightful concept that when i met the other authors and like to tell them about who some of these authors are or what they're going to write about because that gives you a sense of where you can take this, the diversity that's been going on. >> the other two books that have already been published in the series, one is a biography of augustin's confession by gary wells who has, of course, written about augustin several times during his career. and then this is a biography of the tibetan book of the dead by donald lopez who's up at the university
and virginia is the big exception to this because they are the ones as john pointed out that established religious freedom, separation of church and state and so forth. if you look at these stasis constitutions and i don't have a political ax to grind, but it fascinates me that almost all of them have very, very specific religious christian, if not protestant qualifications for holding office so you have pennsylvania, for example, the most radical democratic constitution of them all, and in order to serve the government in pennsylvania, you have to uphold the devine inspiration of the old and new testaments. you know, you have to believe in a god. vermont is the one i love. 177 # -- 1776 constitution of the independence of vermont, now this bashing of liberalism, upholds the idea all people serving in government must believe in the inspiration of the devine old and new testaments, obey the sabbath, and be a protestant, catholics, jews, forget about it. they can't serve in government. it's referred to as a federalist argument; right? at what -- did the constitution leave religion out beca
industry. >> i'm glad you asked that. this is a big subject in the book. one of the things that interested me very deeply was that in addition to being the first war to have destructiveness at this level, the first world war was the first propaganda war. why? because up to that point in time in europe in the proceeding several decades, all the wars had been fairly small war colonial conflicts where small volunteer armies went out and put down rebellions in africa or asia or whatever. it didn't require a propaganda effort. you know, certain writers like roger kipling could be counted on to supply the proper kind of poetry and story telling when needed to be, but there wasn't anything organized by the government, but right from the beginning, they seemed to realize that this war was going to require a massive propaganda effort. this was especially true in england, and it was another reason that led me to concentrate on england in the book because along the major powers of europe, they did not have conscription. they still had an all-volunteer army, so whipping up the necessary enthusiasm, th
-30 years ago and think of its reputation now. think of the books that were big in the 60s and 70s, if you're old enough to have been around then, they are very different books now. herbert and marshall and the coastal superstars then, and they don't show up now. that's, i think, the first thing. the other thing is biography of a person, you dig into letters. you dig into rem innocences and -- rem remanents and so on. this was just a delightful concept when i met the other authors and they told me about who the authors are and what they write about. that gives you a sense where to take this diversity of what's going on. >> so the other two books already published in this series, one is a biography of a confession by gary wills who has, of course, wrote about this several times during his career, and then this is a biography of the book of the dead by donald lopez up at the university of michigan. each of them treats this idea in each of the three in a different way, and still and some of the books that are still to come in this series also promise to be very interesting, and vie -- vanessa
state constitutions, and virginia is the big exception to this because they're the ones, as john just pointed out, established religious freedom, separation of church and state and so forth. if you look at these state constitutions, though, and, you know, i don't have a political axe to grind on this question, but it does fascinate me that almost all of them have very, very specific religious, christian if not protestant qualifications for holding office. so you have pennsylvania, for example. the most radical, democratic constitution of them all. in order to serve the government in pennsylvania, you have to uphold the divine inspiration of the old and new testaments. you know, you have to believe in a god. vermont is the one i love. 177 -- as a historian at least, right? 1776 constitution of the independent state of vermont, you know, today this bastion of kind of secular liberalism upholds the idea that, you know, all people serving in government must believe in the inspiration of -- divine inspiration of the old and new testaments, obey the soundness and be a protestant. so you've
are prone to violence but have reported side to them. can you just -- >> yes. there was a big part of his persona. he wrote poetry. he was always described in personal dealings with him as generally considered far from as screen. not a pleasant person. is not a pleasant person to be a round ball. much more rigid, much more didactic. mind you, we're talking about the characters, somebody who planned to 9/11. that didn't want to push that went too far. in portraying osama bin laden it was important to get him right in see him as his acolyte who is going to put his life on the line for this plot would see him as an inspirational figure. that only makes sense because you're not seeing him when you are the reader. you aren't seeing him through the americans what do you been seeing it to the point of view of someone who is actually experiencing and has been inspired by him. you want to understand how that could possibly be. >> one of the things your characters from the west german least seven common is that they are having to use different identities. he has to change its name. the characters a
glad you asked that. this is a big subject in my book. one of the things that interests me very deeply was that in addition to being the first war to have destructiveness that this technological level, the first world war was really the pursed propaganda war. why? because up to that point in time in europe and the preceding several decades all the wars have been small-scale colonial conflicts where small volunteer armies, you know, germans, frenchmen, and was men went out and put down colonial rebellions in africa, asia, concord new colonies. it did not require a propaganda effort. you know, certain riders like rudyard kipling to be counted on for supply of the proper kind of poetry and story telling and so forth. there wasn't anything organized by the government by the government. right from the beginning they seem to realize that this war was going to require a massive propaganda effort. this was especially true of england, and it was another reason that led me to concentrate on england in this book. alone of the major powers in europe britain did not have conscription. they had stil
a very conventional life in ohio, big brood of kids. involved in church causes but she was part of one of, she was maybe the most interesting person to me in some ways because she really struggled to negotiate between her children, even as her views were being challenged. >> so talk about norman and walkers through the real crises the brothers faced as a question of service was engaged. >> norman became a pacifist in the 1960s, or right before the united states entered the war and he became involved in some organizations, antiwar organizations. that was sort of the very structure that would become the aclu after the war. [inaudible] he sort of started working, they went through political channels and also kind of grassroots organizations. and evan didn't believe in politics. and he just wanted -- he had kind of a martyr streak. he decided to come back to the united states and take a stand. ralph really heated wilson's call for a fight for freedom and are the kind of what whether this or whether to become an officer. ended up he wanted to become a fighter pilot. [inaudible] >> arthur was m
you asked that next. this is big subject of my book. one of the things that interested me very deeply was that in addition to being the first war to have, you know, destructiveness of this technological level, the first world war was really the first propaganda war. why? because up to that point in time in europe, in the preceding several decades all the wars had been fairly small-scale colonial conflicts where small volunteer armies, you know, of germans, french men, english men, went out and put down colonial rebellions in africa or asia or conquered new colonies in africa or whatever. it didn't require a propaganda effort. certain writers like rudyard kipling could be counted on to supply the proper kind of story telling and poetry when needed but there wasn't anything organized by the government. but, right from the beginning they seemed to realize that this war was going to require a massive propaganda effort. this was especially true in england and it was another reason that led me to concentrate on england in this book because alone of the major powers in europe britain did not
property. i don't think i would comment beyond that. >> big publisher of poems repress, thank you for a few minutes . . who remembers as a girl she lived next door to a lithuanian jewish family. she recalls she would call for young josephine to turn the light on for her. 60 years later you could hear the pride in her voice being called upon for that task. it's probable families living in our tenement open until the year 1935 discussed or of mitered norman thomas. tonight we are pleased to discuss his life and work with louisa thomas d. author of conscience. she will be signing copies of the book after the topic and keep in mind when you buy a book your supporting the author, the publisher and the museum. if you choose to become a member this evening, we will give you a complimentary copy of conscience. tonight's conversation is led by john mechem, executive editor and vice president of random house. a former editor of newsweek and pulitzer prize-winning author and commentator on politics,?g?g history and religious base in?gg america and is editor of our jeg public media and contributor tog
. it gives us the view point of hitler and his generals. and andrew is trying to answer the really big question that has haunted historians and many others for the last 70 years. why did germany lose the war? was it the superiority of th allied powers? or was it strategic errors on hitler's part? in fact, with all of hitler's advantages how could he have possibly ever lost this war? andrew roberts' great contribution is to let us participate, in effect, in a grand strategy course centered upon hitler and his generals. of all the books that have been published on world war ii, none before have viewed it from this perspective alone. it is an absolutely intriguing story, and i urge you all to get yourself a copy. surprisingly, there are copies for sale in the corner on the left here. but first, before you rush out to buy this copy, first, a few words from the great historian himself. and, yes, he does turn out to be a young one. andrew roberts. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, it's a great honor to be invited to address you this owning, and -- this evening, and thank you very much inde
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)